All about seeds

How to Care for Your Flower Garden

Saturday, October 10th, 2009

Knowing how to care for your flower garden can make a big difference in the look and over-all health of your plants. Here are some simple hints to make your garden bloom with health

1. The essentials must always be given major consideration.

Your flower garden must have an adequate supply of water, sunlight, and fertile soil. Any lack of these basic necessities will greatly affect the health of plants. Water the flower garden more frequently during dry spells.

When planting bulbs, make sure they go at the correct depth. When planting out shrubs and perennials, make sure that you don’t heap soil or mulch up around the stem. If you do, water will drain off instead of sinking in, and the stem could develop rot through overheating.

2. Mix and match perennials with annuals.

Perennial flower bulbs need not to be replanted since they grow and bloom for several years while annuals grow and bloom for only one season. Mixing a few perennials with annuals ensures that you will always have blooms coming on.

3. Deadhead to encourage more blossoms.

How To Tell If Old Seeds Is Still Worthy For Planting

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

Some kinds of seeds must be sown soon after ripening or they will not grow. Others retain their life (viability) from one year to another depending on the conditions under which they are stored. A test for germination can easily be made before planting time by cutting a circle of flannel or paper towel to fit the bottom of a plate.

By marking the material in four divisions, four different kinds of seeds may be tested at one time. The cloth is moistened and ten or 25 seeds placed on each division.

Cover with another plate or with a pane of glass to hold in the moisture. Label each kind of seed planted including the date planted. Inspect the seeds from time to time. Count the number that sprout. If none germinate and the seeds are choice ones, test a second time.

Hardcoated seeds are slow to germinate. Kicking the seeds slightly may enable them to grow. Some seeds may require a period of cool or freezing temperatures. If none grow after giving them ample time for germination, the seeds are probably no good and it would be useless to plant the remainder of the lot.

Ordering Seeds for the Successful Garden

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

February, like January, is primarily a month for indoor gardening. He who has the seeing eye and sensitive heart finds beauty in Nature’s season of sleep and rest. It is an indispensable period. But the gardener’s spirit lifts after January is gone and he senses the change as days lengthen to shorten nights dark curtain.

Successful gardens depend upon carefully planning ahead. Most of the seed catalogs have arrived by this time. Order seeds of some of the newer varieties of vegetables and flowers which cannot be obtained locally, if you have not already done so. You may also wish to get seeds for trying some of the new annual and perennial flowers.

Each year a committee of experts selects the outstanding new-creations of flowers and vegetables. Probably no more than five per cent of the yearly selections possess the qualities necessary to assume a permanent place in our flower and vegetable gardens. Most of the annual winners simply get the spotlight for a year or two and then their glamorous roles are soon forgotten.

The gardening public, working under various soil and climatic conditions, makes the final decision regarding the real merits of the All-America selections.

The Problem Of Planting Too Early

Saturday, March 21st, 2009

February in the North is an exceedingly trying month for “the home gardener” The days are growing longer and winter seems to be on the wane, but there is so little that can be done and there is a great desire to be doing something. Some gardeners just cant wait to get started and they do things that should not be done.

For example, there are those who make the mistake of starting flower seeds in the house expecting to get a head start on the coming season. In the North, February is much too soon for this. The germination of the seeds is not the problem; they sprout very readily, but seedling plants do not have good enough growing conditions in the house at this time of year.

When they have grown a few inches tall, they start to lean toward the light and soon grow pale, thin and spindly. What was started with high hopes soon becomes a great disappointment and usually discourages the eager gardener from trying this interesting and profitable adventure when it should be done, under more favorable circumstances and at a time when there is a very good chance for success.

Long Winter – Don’t Start Too Soon With Seeds

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

February in the North is an exceedingly trying month for “the home gardener” The days are growing longer and winter seems to be on the wane, but there is so little that can be done and there is a great desire to be doing something. Some gardeners just cant wait to get started and they do things that should not be done.

For example, there are those who make the mistake of starting flower seeds in the house expecting to get a head start on the coming season. In the North, February is much too soon for this. The germination of the seeds is not the problem; they sprout very readily, but seedling plants do not have good enough growing conditions in the house at this time of year.

When they have grown a few inches tall, they start to lean toward the light and soon grow pale, thin and spindly. What was started with high hopes soon becomes a great disappointment and usually discourages the eager gardener from trying this interesting and profitable adventure when it should be done, under more favorable circumstances and at a time when there is a very good chance for success.

Aerogarden Tricks and Tips

Sunday, September 14th, 2008

A lot of homes today have their garden indoors. Through Hydroponics and Aeroponics a new gardening kit called AeroGarden made indoor gardening easy and not messy. Growing plants in Aero Garden does not required soil.

Huge space is not needed for indoor gardening when using AeroGarden. The equipment measures 16 inches long by 10 ” inches wide by 15 ” inches high with the lowest light setting, and then 21 inches high at the highest. The AeroGarden can be put in any corner of the house.

People can now make their own organic-based plants inside their home whenever they want. Another great thing about the AeroGarden is that it monitors the plants itself. It has a system that creates ideal growing condition for the plants and its microprocessor controls the watering and the lights too. And when it is time to add more water and nutrients for the plants it will alert to catch the attention of the owner.

Using the AeroGarden is so easy. The kit already contains everything that is needed to start indoor gardening that includes gourmet herbs seed kit to plant in and harvest in about four months. Then, just follow these five simple steps; first, insert the pre-seeded grow pods, add water and drop two nutrient tablets. Next, plug-in the AeroGarden equipment and lastly, select the plant type.

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