Archive for December, 2009

How to Train Spruce Picea

Wednesday, December 30th, 2009

How to Train Spruce Picea

Picea Spruce derived from the family of Pinaceae. At one time, the trees were listed under pine, yet new discoveries lead plant growers to see this specimen as the Genus. The Latin Genus is dubbed resin, pitch, or Pix resin. The tree grows in mountain regions, and throughout the northern areas, producing around fifty specimens to name. The conifer has crowns that consistently point and branches that slope, sagging into sub-branches. The specimens include white spruce, Norway spruce, black spruce, oriental spruce, Caucasian spruce, Hondo spruce, jezo spruce, and so on.

Spruce trees are evergreens and members of the pine trees. The trees are shaped like pyramids and have short needles, cones that droop, and soft light colored wood. When the tree is trained as the bonsai, it presents an amazing grove-like texture. In fact, if you want a forest grove inside your home or in your garden the Picea Spruce is your choice.

Spruce is produced from seeds, cuttings, layering, grafting, etc. The plants require detailed care. To grow the plants from seeds you will need the cones. Select your cones in September and up until January. (Excluding the Picea Glauca cones, which you should pick in August and/or September) The cones must dry before you can start propagation.

How to Choose Bonsai Variants

Monday, December 28th, 2009

How to Choose Bonsai Variants

Variants of Bonsai Semi-cascade, Cascade, Moyogi, etc, include Broom and Literati. Broom elms are American-based trees, which its trunk extends in a straight line on a single growth. Its circlet has a selection of minute twigs, which glow and form the shape of a broom. Broom bonsai?s are similar to Asian trees, which are cultivated for resisting Dutch elm illness, and are the Genus Zelkova. Learn more about Japanese Greybark Elm seeds to relate to the Broom Bonsai.

Literati trees have elongated, small in width trunks. The trunk grows in a straight line, slants, and/or curves somewhat. At the upper section of the tree, about a third up, branches grow from the tree, and near the top, the branches balance someone at a point.

Variants of bonsai include Italian Cypress, which is one of the Grove series. The tree grows up to 22 inches. Pistachio Grove grows up to 18 inches. Pistachio is an ancient, small Asian tree. The Mediterranean, Asian tree is a member of the cashew family, and yields hard-shell nuts. The kernel is edible. Pistachio Vera is its Latin name.

How to Train Flowering Quince Bonsai

Saturday, December 26th, 2009

How to Train Flowering Quince Bonsai

Chaenomeles or the Flowering Quince is a delightful plant to train as the bonsai, especially for those who enjoy flowers. Quince is a member of the Rosaceae family, and is born in native regions, Japan, etc. The shrubs produce deciduous leaves, which have strikingly beautiful springtime blooms. The blooms are surrounded by desirous, yellow fruits. The branches twist and are thorny. As they say, ?Every Rose has its thorn.? You cannot have beauty without having a little danger. Therefore, if you choose this plant, watch your fingers.

The flowering quince includes the Japonica (Chaenomeles lagenaria), which has spiky twisted shrubs that are around six ?-feet tall when matured. The shrubs are shimmering green with oval shaped hairless leaves that form serrated edge. The tree starts to develop flowers around March. The flowers are dark red, whitish-pink, pink, etc. The fruits that grow in October are bitter, scented yellow.

Maul Flowering Quince (Chaenomeles Japonica) has spiky bushes that grow up to three ? feet tall. The tree often develop patterns, such as spreading habits, which are tightly joined. The leaves are smooth, oval, green, and grows brilliantly red flowers. The flowers start its growth in March and continues to grow fruits in October. The spherical, yellow-green fruits have a touch of red contrasts. You cannot eat the fruits, yet you can enjoy the aroma.

How to Treat Diseased Bonsai White Pines

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

How to Treat Diseased Bonsai White Pines

Before you can treat ill or pest damaged White Pines you must first detect the cause. For instance, there are many types of pests and disease to watch out for, such as the pine weevils, bark beetles, pine chafers, bee hawk moth, pine hawk moth, pine sawfly, bombyx, or caterpillar, galerucid beetle or chysomelid and the leaf beetle. Disease can include red-band, honey fungus, rust, pine leaf cast, etc.

How to detect pest damage:
All sorts of little bugs roam outdoors and many are attracting to aromatic plants and trees. The bugs will feed and nest on plants and trees, which is their role in nature. The problem is the pests over do them selves? This brings in humans, which it is our role to minimize or eliminate bug damage and decay. When we think of caterpillars often, we consider harmless creatures that grow as beautiful butterflies. The facts however is that these harmless creatures rarely nest or damage Scot pine, yet it will damage other plants. Caterpillars are sometimes called moth larvae, which these pests will feed on plant tissue and weaken the tree. Caterpillars can also cause decaying. The caterpillars are grouped, i.e. you have the bombycoid moths or sponge caterpillars, and the leaf rollers. In addition, you must consider the leaf miners, goat moth, leopard moth, geometer moth, small ermine moth, and so on.

How to Choose Nursery Bonsai Trees

Monday, December 21st, 2009

How to Choose Nursery Bonsai Trees

Purchasing a bonsai from a nursery is easier to maintain than those you extract from the earth. When you shop for bonsai the first thing you want to do is consider the main branches, shape, and the trunk. The trunk should be well shaped. In addition, you want to find herbs, or bonsai trees that are healthy.

When you shop for bonsai at nurseries, also consider pot plants, sparse, legs, backfields, bins, etc. Fringe regions and plants that will function well in your greenhouse are optional as well. If you spot a potential healthy bonsai that requires minimal attention, you can often prune the tree, which will promote growth.

In nurseries, you may find bonsai plants, which customers ignore. A few helpful details could make the plant worth your while. For instance, if you find older privet, you can shape the branches, and use several trunks to produce miniature bonsai trees in several smaller pots. You can use shrubs to make the windswept bonsai by tilting the plant and shaping it to match the common bonsai style. You will need to learn training techniques to complete this task.

Propagation and the Japanese White Pine Bonsai

Friday, December 18th, 2009

Propagation and the Japanese White Pine Bonsai
How to propagation the Japanese White Pine

The Japanese White Pine bonsai is a very attractive plant. The plant requires care however to maintain its growth and to keep the plant in shape. The White Pine is the body of Pinus Parviflora, Pinus Pentaphylla. White pine comes from North America and grows rapidly once developed. The pine tree is a native or eastern grown North America bush with soft durable wood. White pine includes the group of Pinus Strobus also. The pine may grow five-needle collections about the wood.

To propagate or grow a bonsai tree, first you must consider the plant. Are you growing the tree from seedlings? Pine trees grow ripe cones, which start developing after a couple years of growth. At this time, you can gather the cones and place them in a warm, dry environment. The best time to gather the cones is around September or in October. Once the cones start to open you, want to gather the seeds from the pine and saturate them in water.

Training Bonsai from the Crataegus Ornamental Thorns

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

Training Bonsai from the Crataegus Ornamental Thorns
How to train Crataegus Ornamental Thorns bonsai

The family of Rosaceae brought attention to the kinfolk Crataegus Ornamental Thorns. The plants are grown throughout native regions, North America, western Europe, Asia, etc. Rarely will you find a specimen taller than 23-feet. The tree produces edible fruits. The fruits will bloom in spring and sprout up orange, red, yellow, or even black fruits. During the summer and spring, sometimes the Crataegus Ornamental Thorns group will sprout flowers. The flowers are pretty pink, white, and/or red. The trees has thorns. The leaves are serrated, deciduous, and have round projecting parts, or lobes.

Crataegus cuneata is a native or Japan species, which shrubs produce serrated leaves that edge around flowers, which are pink, white, etc. The fruits are yellow or red. The flowers begin its bloom in the lovely month of spring. Propagation starts with seeds, spring layering, or grafting.

How to seed:
Crataegus Ornamental Thorns produce seeds inside the fruit. Before the fruit ripens, you can pick the fruit and allow them to rot. You can place them in the middle of layered sand. Sow in the fall, which starts germination in May. The fruit may not grow for a few years once you sow your seeds.

How to Shape Bonsai

Monday, December 14th, 2009

How to Shape Bonsai

During the first year of growing bonsai, you will not need to wire the plant unless you see a need to. You can lightly wire the plants if you begin growth at the harden stage. You must remove the wires shortly however to promote healthy growth.

How to shape formal uprights:
If you are, growing formal upright bonsai tie the trunk so that it grows upright. You can tie it to a stake that has a straight guide. The stake should be positioned close to the tree. You want to avoid injuring the roots, therefore when you tie the tree be sure to caution work between the tree and stake. At a few intervals, you want to tie the strings around the trunk and wrap them loosely. Use materials, such as nylon to avoid injury.

After the plant starts growth, you want to focus on the branch tips. Nip them so that the branches do not grow wildly. Fine twigs promote great shaping techniques to grow bonsai. You want to prune the roots during the spring, i.e. each spring. You can lift the plants from its container to complete the task.

Growing Thymes as Ideal Bonsai

Saturday, December 12th, 2009

Growing Thymes as Ideal Bonsai
How to, up bring thymes

Thymus or thymes grow minute size leaves and frail features. You can find thymes in a variety of forms, including patterns and color. In addition, you will find many shapes, size, variegations, flowery colors, aromatic scents etc. One of the popular thymes is the Thymus citriodorus ?aureus, or the Golden lemon. Citriodorus ?argeneteus is the body of silver thymes. The thymes grow brilliant yellow culinary or aromatic shrubs, which are offset by stark white tones. Yellow separates the stark white, since it is defined as ?aureus while the white defines ?argeneteus. The aromatic lemony scent changes the effect of these golden forms.

Akin to the golden thymes and the silver thymes is the Thymus herba-barana, or Caraway thymes. The thymes have unique aromatic odors and minute size leaves, which are easily shaped into bonsai. The older plants with trunks the size of fingers grows up to 6-inches. Most caraway thymes are called ?creepers? however.

How to Care for Bonsai Cuttings

Thursday, December 10th, 2009

How to Care for Bonsai Cuttings

How to care for bonsai cuttings depend on the type of plant, seed, herb, etc you have chosen. The cuttings care is often based on type of season, care, and the plant itself. During the spring when cuttings start to bloom is the best time to start growing your own cuttings. During the spring months, you can find cuttings with semi-hard stems, which grow between the hardwood and green bendable cycle.

Again, it depends on the type of plant you choose, however cuttings can produce stunning bonsai trees if trained correctly.

The choice of cuttings may include pine, juniper, maple, elm, etc. Outdoor maples are deciduous trees that start growth from winged seeds. The northern temperate trees can grow dividing leaves, which the colors are stunning during fall months. The seeds often start in pairs. Maple trees are often cultivated for its hardwood, since it is used to make furnisher and sub-floors. Maple is also cultivated for its sugar maple flavors that are added to foodstuff. The sap is processed. When choosing maple cuttings you want to remember the plants are grown in cool climates. As well, the small twigs desired to grow bonsai is around 1/16 inches in diameters, or ? inches.